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Latin Tutorial Courses

Please note that all of these courses are NOT for credit. Although, if coordinated with your teachers and/or professors some credit may be forthcoming provided your educational institution approves of the credit offered. This may entail the student providing extra work outside the scope of the course tutorials above to your institution to receive credit. Email Mr. O at timothy.p.oflaherty@mroteaches.com for specifics.

Different courses require different textbooks, purchased at student expense. Upon enrollment, Mr. O will send each student a syllabus for his or her class, to include a hyperlink to our textbook.

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Courses are never available on Sundays

A basic tutorial to assist the student of Classical Latin with difficult grammatical and morphological concepts, to include, but not limited to noun and adjective inflection, conjugation of indicative and subjunctive verbs, the “Periodic” style to help beginners read Classical Latin. Mr. O provides learning aides and PDF formatted handouts to assist the student.

 

All primary grammars are welcome. If you use Wheelock, Ecce, Romani! the Cambridge Latin Series (North American Edition) or any other number Latin primers out there in the public domain, it’s very Likely Mr. O is familiar with your textbook, and probably owns a couple of worn out copies himself, and can help you prep for your weekly quiz and test assessments without a student having to buy any new Latin preparatory materials or workbooks.

Courses are never available on Sundays

As the name of the tutorial course suggests, this series of lessons builds upon the foundational instruction of Beginner’s Latin, usually introducing Latin students to the more complex concepts such as poetical scansion and meter, the sequence of subjunctive moods, more complex grammar and simplified lessons to help students memorize and use correctly pronouns such as ille, illa, illud, is, ea, id, etc.

If a student can handle this course material, Mr. O might ask the student to read longer passages from famous authors such as Catullus or Cicero, appropriate the intermediate Latin student’s abilities, and begin the transition to more advanced Latin material, either an independent study or the Advanced Placement Latin Exam tutorial course (see Courses and Tutorials descriptions below).

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Courses are never available on Sundays

One of Mr. O’s favorite courses to teach online. In this course, both student and Mr. O settle upon an author they wish to read. Do you want to read and translate Suetonius’ biographies of the emperors? Why not! How about Caesar’s Bellum Civile, Horace, Tacitus, or any other number of Latin authors from the Republic through the late Empire. The student gets to choose from this buffet of authors:

 

  • Ammianus Marcellinus

  • Tacitus

  • Caesar

  • Vergil

  • Horace

  • Martial 

  • Catullus

  • Ovid

  • Suetonius

  • Pliny the Younger

  • Sallust

  • Marcus Tullius Cicero

 

…And whatever other author you can think of that may catch your fancy. You choose which author and how long you want to do your reading. Mr. O has had students who’ve spent a year reading all the works of a single author, and some who just want to do several authors just for the highlights. Again, this is the Latin student’s call.

Courses are never available on Sundays

Only 20% of all high school students who take the Latin Advanced Placement Exam get a 3 or higher. How do you get that 3, 4 or the best 5 score? There is a method to the madness. Let Mr. O show you how to get into that 20th percentile so that you not only pass the Latin Advanced Placement Exam but if your college or university accepts AP credits, get your score accepted for equivalent course work at university when you enroll.

 

As the AP Latin Exam has gone through several revisions over the last few decades (Cicero was dropped and Caesar was brought back), the AP Latin Exam’s two main authors and works are Vergil’s Aeneid and Gaius Julius Caesar’s De Bello Gallico. Pliny the Younger makes an appearance, as do Horace and Catullus and even Martial and Livy. 

 

Mr. O guides you through this exam and teaches you how to “beat the test.” Use caution, however, as it generally takes about 36 months to prep the preliminary groundwork to take on the very difficult AP Latin Exam. A student should have a pretty good grasp on Latin grammar and morphology, some historical background of the works featured in the exam, the times in which the authors wrote and lived, as well an ability to do literary analysis and produce the long-form essays with AP Latin inspired prompts. Model AP Latin Exams provided to the students to sharpen their test-taking skills.

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Greek Tutorial Courses

Please note that all of these courses are NOT for credit. Although, if coordinated with your teachers and/or professors some credit may be forthcoming provided your educational institution approves of the credit offered. This may entail the student providing extra work outside the scope of the course tutorials above to your institution to receive credit. Email Mr. O at timothy.p.oflaherty@mroteaches.com for specifics.

Different courses require different textbooks, purchased at student expense. Upon enrollment, Mr. O will send each student a syllabus for his or her class, to include a hyperlink to our textbook.

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Courses are never available on Sundays

Whether you use Athenaze or Hansen and Quinn, we jump right in and learn to read ancient Attic Greek right away. Like Latin, there’s indicative, subjunctive and aorist verbs as well as inflection of nouns and adjectives. We take it all head on, and within a three-month period, a student should have enough “footing” to be able to take on Zenophone’s Anabasis and other writers of Attic prose.

Courses are never available on Sundays

Mr. O and the student pick up right where they left off with the Introduction to Ancient Greek course tutorial. We now learn about “sequence of moods,” build upon our vocabulary and master active, middle and passive voice verbs.

 

As skills develop, we introduce ancient Greek poetical meter and plays such as Medea or Seven against Thebes. Mr. O provides handouts to facilitate understanding and assists students parsing this incredibly rich literary language.

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Courses are never available on Sundays

If a student has the skill sets and enjoys mythology and heroic epic, this course is for you. Treat yourself to Homer and his world in which Mr. O shares with students his love of the Odyssey as well as the Iliad. Homeric hymns are added to the tutorial as students develop their skills with Greek epic meter, the dactylic.

 

Discussed are Homeric questions that have bedeviled scholars for centuries: Did Homer actually exist? How much of the Bronze Age is represented in Homer’s works? How much is Homer’s time mixed in with his works? What was Homer’s world and environment like when he composed his works? These and other tantalizing questions Mr. O attempts to answer.

Courses are never available on Sundays

For those students who wish to read the New Testament in the original language it was written in: Koine, or if you prefer, ‘the common man’s’, Greek. This tutorial assumes that the student already has some working knowledge of Classical ancient Greek to build upon. Not for beginners!

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Courses are never available on Sundays

This tutorial is for the advanced student reading prose or verse authors in the original Greek at the collegiate level (or a high school level that offers ancient Greek). Authors may include any or all of the Greek Tragedians, Thucydides, Herodotus, Pindar and Hesiod. The student decides which author they need assistance with or wish to translate for the pure fun of it!

Courses are never available on Sundays

As the course title suggests, this tutoring session, like the Advanced Placement Latin Exam tutorial course listed above, helps the advanced ancient Greek student navigate the difficult National Greek Exam issued by the American Classical League. Given to those high school ancient Greek students who wish to pass this exam with as high a score as possible. This tutorial covers everything: mythology, translation and syntax, literary analysis and so much more.

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Roman History Courses

Please note that all of these courses are NOT for credit. Although, if coordinated with your teachers and/or professors some credit may be forthcoming provided your educational institution approves of the credit offered. This may entail the student providing extra work outside the scope of the course tutorials above to your institution to receive credit. Email Mr. O at timothy.p.oflaherty@mroteaches.com for specifics.

Different courses require different textbooks, purchased at student expense. Upon enrollment, Mr. O will send each student a syllabus for his or her class, to include a hyperlink to our textbook.

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Courses are never available on Sundays

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  • The Dissolution of the Republic and the Establishment of the Principat...

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    1 hr

    $50 USD/per hour

Courses are never available on Sundays

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